Book 5, Part 1.2: The Death of Trojans

To Start From the Beginning Click HERE.
To Read the Previous Post Click HERE.


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Athena randomly being angry at Ares and pulling him aside seems kind of sudden and odd – – until we remember that Athena just gave the Argives an advantage and wants to be sure Ares doesn’t think to do the same. She wants the Argives to have as much time as possible to kill as many Trojans as possible.

I find Idomeneus to be slightly unhinged and his brother Meriones as being a bit bloodthirsty. I also see both counting the deaths they deal as sacrifices to their gods. I’m not sure why I’m thinking this? I don’t know much about early Crete… But that’s what Idomeneus is doing in the fourth panel, looking up to his god and trying to honour Him with Phaestus’ death. I’m not sure that Phaestus appreciates this…

Honestly, this part of the story I find to be very depressing and I found myself emotional as I drew it. Homer gives us these little windows into the lives of the Trojans who are being killed. The question is why? Are we supposed to feel bad for them? To see their deaths as useless and pointless? Or maybe it’s supposed to make us feel like their deaths are valid. Phereclus has a really horribly painful death – – but he IS the one who made the ships for Paris, so this war is, in some respects, his fault. Pedaeus is an illegitimate son. And yet… Phaestus was just a local Trojan ally. Odios probably was as well. Scamandrios has dedicated himself to Artemis, which means he would have been a young, virgin dude who really had no business being at war. Hypsenor was the son of a priest. Did any of these guys really deserve to die? I think Homer is saying, “Absolutely not.” Which. Is not surprising. The Iliad is usually thought of as a Greek work, because it has come down to us from Greeks. However, Homer is said to be from Lydia. Lydia is in Asia Minor. He was from the same area as Trojans. The Iliad is often way more pro-Trojan than pro-Achaean/Argive/Greek. The Greeks are vicious and bloodthirsty and angry and cruel. The Trojans are merely trying to defend their city.

I think this is especially clear when we consider the final panel. The Argives toil in war, but the Trojans that they have just killed? They are traders and merchants, craftsmen and artisans, farmers and shepherds. They are innocent.


To Read The Wounding of Diomedes Click HERE.

Book 5, Part 1.1: Diomedes Descends

To Start From the Beginning Click HERE.
To Read Book 4 Recap Click HERE.
To Read the Previous Post Click HERE.


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I find it interesting that Athena chooses Diomedes to grant special strength to, considering how she is the patron of Odysseus all throughout the Odyssey, one might think that Odysseus gets to be the hero. HOWEVER, Odysseus is less war hero and more tactician, when Diomedes, well, I believe Diomedes is able to more easily connect with the spiritual world. I think he’s the only Argive who would be able to receive the gift Athena gives him – – but this is all conjecture.

ALSO, Phegeus’ brother Idaeus should never have left his brother’s body behind. The fact that Hephaistos is willing to save this coward does NOT leave him in a good light. BUT, I really like that Hephaistos is shown as being compassionate and that we have a glimpse of him grieving. I drew Idaeus to look a bit like Hephaistos in order to show the almost familial connection he has with the god-smith.

ALSO, this is not the first time Diomedes steals horses and it won’t be the last. He is ALWAYS stealing horses. Always. I’m not entirely sure why this is important, but eventually I’ll figure it out and share the information with you.

ALSO, I enjoy Panic and Terror.

As a side note: I’m probably going to shift to posting on Mondays and Wednesdays (with the Occasional Friday), since I’m going to start posting Random Writing Prompts over at the NaomiRuth Facebook page.


To Read The Death of Trojans Click HERE.

Book 4, Part 3.2: Revenge Pleases Eris

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To Read the Previous Post Click HERE.


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I love how Homer wraps up this mini story about Simoeisius inside of this great epic about war and rage. The image of this young dead boy as this rotting tree trunk is visually engaging and I wish I could paint better, because I would paint this scene.

The idea of death begetting more death and how revenge only results in more pain and more grief comes out so clearly in this mini Odysseus moment.

On a less serious note: when Apollo is shouting at the Trojans all I could imagine was that scene from the Princess Bride when the guy at the gate keeps shouting: “Stand your ground, men! Stand your ground!” Which was fairly distracting while I was drawing that panel. I had to re-draw Apollo because it was so bad the first time.

I was not expecting Eris to have the presence that She does, but it’s appropriate, and I have a feeling She’s going to continue to pop up unexpectedly.

AND that’s it for Book 4. We will have a recap on Friday of what all happened in Book 4 and then we shall continue on to Book 5 on Sunday. Book 5 is centered on Diomedes. I have drafted the script for Parts 1.1 and 1.2. ALSO, Aeneas is going to show up, FINALLY.


To Read Book 4: Recap Click HERE.
To Start Book 5, Diomedes Descends Click HERE.

Book 4, Part 3.1: First Blood

To Start From the Beginning Click HERE.
To Read the Previous Post Click HERE.


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While I have been incredibly affected by my reading of The War of Achilles by Caroline Alexander, I have to say re-reading this chapter really makes me look at it through the anti-war lens. People die, horrible, in stupid, useless deaths, for no good reason at all. Again and again we are told the victim’s names, their stories – – especially the Trojan.

More death is coming in 3.2: Revenge Pleases Eris.

Book 4, Part 2.2: Agamemnon is Annoying and Eris Awaits

To Start From the Beginning Click HERE.
To Read the Previous Post Click HERE.


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Don’t mess with Odysseus, hehehe…

ALSO, I drew Diomedes with a little bit of scruff to show that time has past, because I feel like so much time has gone by with people just staring at each other or being dramatic.

Sthenelus looks a lot like how I drew Macbeth back when I was teaching. Whoops.

Also, also: yes. I have a ridiculous love of Alliteration that borders on the absurd. Shhh…

In the second to last panel you will see Terror and Panic. Panic actually showed up riding a horse in one of the previous posts. If you can find him you will prove that you have way too much time on your hands. Haha… Ahem. Sorry. One day I will actually have prizes of some sort that I will award you. I’ll be working on that this month *fingers crossed*

ANYWAYS. Next week will be “First Blood” and everything gets serious for awhile. If there is humour it will be rather macabre. BUT ALSO DIOMODES is going to be starring in most of Book 5 & 6, so we can all look forward to that.

Thank you, lovelies, and have a wonderful rest of your day!


To Read First Blood Click HERE.

Book 4, Part 2.1: Agamemnon and His Troops

To Start from the Beginning, Click HERE.

To Read the Previous Post, Click HERE.

For Recaps of Book 2 & 3, Click HERE and HERE.


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This second perusal of the troops is one of the reasons why people think The Iliad was written by more than one author. It was not that long ago where we were introduced to all of the generals. Also, it’s a little awkward. I mean. Paris and Menelaus were just fighting. Agamemnon calls for war. And meanwhile, all of the Trojans are just STANDING there, twiddling their thumbs, waiting. HOWEVER, one could argue that we’re just about to plunge into battle, it’s a good idea to remind your audience of some of the Most Valuable Players, especially considering this was originally a tale that was being told outloud from memory to a crowd that may not be consistent. Repetition is important to remind people of what is going on and who is going on

Also, Nestor does not speak consistently at all, and while normally I am all about having consistent dialogue I have come to accept that Nestor just does what he likes and really doesn’t care what I think.

Also, I don’t really care about the Ajax’s (at least, not in The Iliad. Sophocle’s play is another story).

Also, also, Idomeneus finally gets to speak. Hooray for him!

Join us next time for Book 4, Part 2.2: Agamemnon is Annoying and Eris Awaits.

Book 4, Part 1.2: A Fine Fool

To Start From the Beginning Click HERE.
To Read the Previous Post Click HERE.


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This part of the story leaves us with a question. A question that may not have an answer. Does Agamemnon actually care about his brother? We haven’t really seen him show any affection to anyone. At all. Or is he simply using Menelaus’ wound to re-start the battle and convince his soldiers to fight? Honestly, I’m not sure. I think it would be easy to say he’s just using Menelaus since he’s an arrogant illegitimate son of a lady dog HOWEVER, there is something to this freakingout-panicattack-ohgods-Agamemnon that feels legit to me. I just don’t know. I tried to leave the comic open to both possible interpretations.

Also, poor Menelaus.

Also, also: here is another question. Who is the fine fool? Is it Pandarus, who is simply listening to what a god told him to do who wanted honor and glory just as any fine soldier would? Or is it the man shouting unreasonably at the front of a battle line? I will always love my little Panda-Pandarus, so… I am biased and you’ll know what my answer is. ;P

Also, also, also: Talthybius shows up way more often than I thought he would. It really makes me want to do a mini-retelling of that one play he shows up in (Hekuba, I think?). Maybe after I finish The Iliad…*daydreams of that wonderful day*

Last Also: if you can correctly guess who all of the soldiers are in the first panel I will give you a round of applause.

NEXT WEEK we will we back with Part 2.1: Agamemnon and His Troops. Nestor is there and some random dudes and pretty much Nothing. Happens. Huzzah?


To Read Agamemnon and His Troops Click HERE.

Book 4, Part 1.1: Meanwhile In Olympos

To Start From the Beginning Click HERE.
To Read Previous Post Click HERE.


 

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Annnnnnnd… We’re back! Huzzah! *throws confetti* It has been so long, my lovelies, so long *sobs loudly* *wails and gnashes teeth*

SO. Moving on.

  1. Never mess with Here. Like. For reals. She gets her way, yo.
  2. What’s up with Carthage being mentioned? Did Carthage even exist at this time? Whaaaaaat? If you are asking yourself these questions: this is sort of an inside joke to myself. In The Aeneid (the one by that kid Virgil) Juno/Hera absolutely loves Carthage (although, in attempts to save it, she comes up with a super sketch plan that ends in death and I’m not sure I would call it a success? but whatevs). BUT we know that years and years and years later there will be the Punic Wars, and Hannibal, and it all ends, ultimately, with Carthage being razed to the ground and destroyed forever by Jupiter/Zeus loving Romans. In my mind this is Jupiter/Zeus getting revenge on Juno/Hera for Troy all those years ago. This doesn’t entirely work because Troy is super, super Hittite but shhhhhh…
  3. Athena plays an odd part in this story and I’m not entirely sure what my thoughts are beyond that, but it’s interesting because she’s wayyyyy more important than Ares and spends a lot of time flying around, interacting with Mortals, making things happen. *ponders a moment*

ANYWAY. We have started Book 4! Hooray! *throws more confetti* We will return on Wednesday for Part 1.2: A Fine Fool.


To Read a Fine Fool Click HERE.