Hittite Prayers & Terror and Panic

A few Mondays ago I got a book in the mail entitled Hittite Prayers by Itamar Singer, as part of the Writings From the Ancient World Series. (Which was very exciting. I almost stopped breathing trying to explain to my mum how excited I was because, yes, I am that much of a nerd.) While reading it today (in between editing pictures, because my editing program is so ridiculously slow) I came across this line:

“You stride through the four eternal corners. The Fears run on your right, the Terrors run on your left” (No. 4c, 6.i-61).

This, of course, reminding me of The Iliad  when the Trojans and Achaeans are facing off to battle after Menelaus is wounded:

“Behind them, Ares, as behind the Greeks/ The goddess Athena with sea-grey eyes,/ And on both sides Terror and Panic” (Lombardo, 4.471-3).

 

I doubt that there’s any true connection there between the Hittite equivalent of Shamash (a sun god) striding around with Terror and Panic and two Greek gods running around with Terror and Panic, but it intrigues me, especially because I am interested in the Hittite underlining of this Greek epic.IMG_2898.jpg


*Those on the right should be recognizable as Panic, Terror, Athena, and Ares. On the left we have Shamash wearing his epic hat and holding something that I’m sure is important in his hands. Next to him are the two viziers Bunene and Misharu both of whom I want to do more research on.

Book 5, Part 7.2: Oh, Ares

To Start From the Beginning Click HERE.
To Read the Previous Post Click HERE.


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First I would like to say: YES WE FINISHED BOOK 5 AHAHAHAHA…

Second, I am laughing at myself because I thought there would be only one Part 7 and instead there were two and part 7.2 was the longest section I’ve had yet.

You can’t really read it, but on the side of the Helmet of Invisibility it says “Property of Hades.” WHICH makes me ask the question: why the heck does Athena even have this? Did she ask to borrow it? Did she steal it? I mean. Hades doesn’t really show up in the Iliad so why does his helmet. So many questions. So. Many.

I find it fascinating how much everyone hates Ares. I really think that this scene with Zeus and Ares is where Homer shows through. When Zeus is talking about how much Ares’ disgusts him all I really see is Homer stepping into the role of Zeus and using him as a way to express how much he himself hates war.

Paieon is not really important, so I didn’t draw him with anything memorable. He is sort of like an avatar of Apollon/Asklepios or something anyway so… Feel free to ignore him.

But Hebe, man. Do I want to know more about Hebe. Who is this random lower ranking goddess? She helps bathe people, helps them into chariots… It’s just so random. She’s like the extra who fills in the un-cast parts or something.

As for the bathing, it may seem random that Zeus is suddenly shouting at Ares to take a bath but remember, despite how clean he looks in the drawing, he is actually COVERED in GUTS. I cannot draw guts, so I apologize for the lack of them, but the point is Ares is disgusting and gross right now and decided THIS is how he should show up to the Father of the Gods. It is incredibly insulting to show up in front of a god in this state. In pretty much every religious tradition you wash yourself before you enter sacred space. This is true for Egyptians, Canaanites, Israelites, Hittites, and all of the Greeks. And yet Ares shows up covered in intestines and soaked through with blood. What are you thinking, Ares? What are you thinking. Athena and Hera might be sassy and make their opinions clear, but both of them prepared beforehand, dressed well, and spruced themselves up first, being aware of sacred space and the proper ways to behave in front of divinity.

Anyway. I could go on, but there’s that.

AND SO, eventually we’ll start up the next book and I’ll get you a recap of Book 5 and everything. I know we’re behind again, but I worked like 58 hours this past week so I’ve just accepted that this will get done when it gets done. I do start my library job training tomorrow and then I have the rest of the day to work on stuff so *fingers crossed* I can get some Book 6 drawing done.

ALSO ALSO I love these little guys and I am so grateful for all of you who have been reading along. Thank you ❤


To Read No Mercy Click HERE.

Book 5, Part 6.1: Sarpedon vs. Tlepolemos

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To Read the Previous Post Click HERE.


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I do think there is a clear message here that in war there is no winner. Sarpedon doesn’t win. Tlepolemos doesn’t win. Each time two people face off it only leads to death on both sides.

I feel like the two Ajaxes are just off in the corner going, “Um? Guys? A little help over here? Maybe? …. Uh…. Anyone?”

And seriously, don’t mess with Odysseus. He will cut you. That being said, I regret how I wrote it and wish I had said: “Soon seven Lycians were slain” or even the ridiculous “Soon Lycians seven were slain.” Oh well.

Um. Yeah. So. I just realized Sarpedon doesn’t have a spear stuck in his leg in the frame where his friends are idiots (how could you miss the giant spear stuck in your friends leg? HOW?) so just imagine it is poking out away from the audience so it’s there you just can’t see it. That totally works yes.

I think Pelagon has a nose? It was supposed to be a tear but look like a nose. DON’T TELL ANYONE SHHHH. No noses allowed.

Ares is so proud.


I CAN’T BELIEVE I GOT THIS READY IN TIME. I’m going to my sister’s this weekend (last weekend for you) so I worked like crazy today to clean two rooms and prepare for two days away AND for when family comes over on Sunday. I didn’t vacuum like I wanted to… but comics are more important. Right? Right.

*raises invisible glass* Here’s to hopefully not getting behind ever again. Cheers!


To Read A Trip to Olympos Click HERE.

Book 5, Part 5.2: Ares and the Lessons of War

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To Read  the Previous Post Click HERE.


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I love how Homer goes out of his way to prove Agamemnon wrong and incompetent as a leader. He says you can never retreat, but both Aeneas and Diomedes do it, and they both have gained glory and honour. Both show up later in The Aeneid (although, yes, Aeneas has a greater role, but still) and both are important cult figures.

Also, Ares turned out better in these ones. He had some weird body issues happening in The Wounding of Aphrodite. I think this just proves that he is better in battle than at waiting by Scamander. Right? Right.

I want the scene between Aeneas and Apollo when Apollo just wakes up, healed. I want that entire temple scene with Aeneas and Leto and Artemis and Apollo waiting outside patiently. OH. I think it is important to note that Apollo was connected to healing (especially through his son Asklepios).

If you’re wondering who Enyo is…. I’ll explain later. Hopefully. If I have time. *dies laughing at the idea of having time*

ALSO I never want to work two jobs and put up three posts in a week while ALSO prepping Sunday posts for the next month and a half because it is way too stressful.

I have a lot of family things happening this weekend so I’m worried about having the post up in time on Monday, but I don’t want to get out of sync again -_- Ugh to being an adult and having to work long hours *faints*

ANYWAYS, have a good weekend my lovelies!


To Read Sarpedon vs. Tlepolemos Click HERE.

Book 5, Part 4.2: Dione and a “Silly Little Girl”

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To Read the Previous Post Click HERE.


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Aphrodite is shown as being this “silly little girl,” but she’s the only one who takes Diomedes as the threat that he is.

Dione, Aphrodite’s mother, has a murky backstory. She is connected with Diana, with Aphrodite herself, and with Canaanite/Hittite goddesses (which makes sense, since Troy is a Hittite town).

BUT what is most important about this scene with Dione and Aphrodite is how it parallels, so closely, the scene between Achilles and his mother Thetis. Both Thetis and Dione initially respond with: “Oh no, my poor baby” but as the scenes unfold they begin to read more and more sarcastic. I am not, currently, entirely sure about the relevance of this, but when I figure it out I’ll let you know.

ALSO, yes, I know, this is terribly late. No promises, but if I’m able to get stuff done tomorrow I’ll put up 5.1 on Wednesday and 5.2 on Friday to try and get back on track. More hours is good money-wise, but frustrating creative-wise. Anyways! I hope you have a good day, my lovlies!


To Read Apollo and Sarpedon Assist the Trojans Click HERE.

Book 5, Part 4.1: The Melodrama of Aphrodite

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To Read the Previous Post Click HERE.


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I’ll have more to say about Aphrodite in the future – – I may even put together a post for her later this month if I’m able to make the time for it, UGH jobs getting in the way of comic-making – – BUT I will say I love how Athena made Ares sit on a riverbank and he’s just sitting there, his horses nearby, his spear resting against a magical cloud of mist, relaxing, as a war is going on. I’m not entirely sure why Ares listens to Athena or why he is so easily distracted from the war (I have him staring fixedly at his biceps, but that’s my interpretation). I have my theories, but that involves my theories on Athena, which would need a post of its own.

ANYWAY. I hope you have a good day lovelies. *throws confetti and fairie dust*


To Read Dione and a “Silly Little Girl” Click HERE.

Book 5, Part 1.2: The Death of Trojans

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To Read the Previous Post Click HERE.


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Athena randomly being angry at Ares and pulling him aside seems kind of sudden and odd – – until we remember that Athena just gave the Argives an advantage and wants to be sure Ares doesn’t think to do the same. She wants the Argives to have as much time as possible to kill as many Trojans as possible.

I find Idomeneus to be slightly unhinged and his brother Meriones as being a bit bloodthirsty. I also see both counting the deaths they deal as sacrifices to their gods. I’m not sure why I’m thinking this? I don’t know much about early Crete… But that’s what Idomeneus is doing in the fourth panel, looking up to his god and trying to honour Him with Phaestus’ death. I’m not sure that Phaestus appreciates this…

Honestly, this part of the story I find to be very depressing and I found myself emotional as I drew it. Homer gives us these little windows into the lives of the Trojans who are being killed. The question is why? Are we supposed to feel bad for them? To see their deaths as useless and pointless? Or maybe it’s supposed to make us feel like their deaths are valid. Phereclus has a really horribly painful death – – but he IS the one who made the ships for Paris, so this war is, in some respects, his fault. Pedaeus is an illegitimate son. And yet… Phaestus was just a local Trojan ally. Odios probably was as well. Scamandrios has dedicated himself to Artemis, which means he would have been a young, virgin dude who really had no business being at war. Hypsenor was the son of a priest. Did any of these guys really deserve to die? I think Homer is saying, “Absolutely not.” Which. Is not surprising. The Iliad is usually thought of as a Greek work, because it has come down to us from Greeks. However, Homer is said to be from Lydia. Lydia is in Asia Minor. He was from the same area as Trojans. The Iliad is often way more pro-Trojan than pro-Achaean/Argive/Greek. The Greeks are vicious and bloodthirsty and angry and cruel. The Trojans are merely trying to defend their city.

I think this is especially clear when we consider the final panel. The Argives toil in war, but the Trojans that they have just killed? They are traders and merchants, craftsmen and artisans, farmers and shepherds. They are innocent.


To Read The Wounding of Diomedes Click HERE.

Book 4, Part 2.2: Agamemnon is Annoying and Eris Awaits

To Start From the Beginning Click HERE.
To Read the Previous Post Click HERE.


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Don’t mess with Odysseus, hehehe…

ALSO, I drew Diomedes with a little bit of scruff to show that time has past, because I feel like so much time has gone by with people just staring at each other or being dramatic.

Sthenelus looks a lot like how I drew Macbeth back when I was teaching. Whoops.

Also, also: yes. I have a ridiculous love of Alliteration that borders on the absurd. Shhh…

In the second to last panel you will see Terror and Panic. Panic actually showed up riding a horse in one of the previous posts. If you can find him you will prove that you have way too much time on your hands. Haha… Ahem. Sorry. One day I will actually have prizes of some sort that I will award you. I’ll be working on that this month *fingers crossed*

ANYWAYS. Next week will be “First Blood” and everything gets serious for awhile. If there is humour it will be rather macabre. BUT ALSO DIOMODES is going to be starring in most of Book 5 & 6, so we can all look forward to that.

Thank you, lovelies, and have a wonderful rest of your day!


To Read First Blood Click HERE.

Book 2, Part 3.1: Homer and Random Greek Dudes

To Start From the Beginning Click HERE.

To Read the Previous Post Click HERE.


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Yes, those are horses. No, they are not giraffes or dinosaur hybrids.

Also, marsh parsley is similar to celery, apparently, according to my eldest sister’s research.

Also, Menelaus so badly wants to be important, but no one is paying any attention to him. He didn’t even make it into the strip this week, poor guy

And I think that is all! The end of Book 3 will be up on Wednesday! Huzzah!


To Read Death Comes at the End… Click HERE.