The Hurrian Tasmisu and The Hellenic Hermes: Brothers of Another… Er… Parent?

In the book Hittite Myths as translated by Harry A. Hoffner, Jr. (second edition) there is a section on Hurrian Myths. In tablet one of “The Song of Ullikummi” it says:

“When Kumarbi [had formed] a clever plan [in his mind], he promptly arose from his chair. In his hand he took a staff; [on his feet] like winged [shoes] he put the winds” (4.Ai 11-15).

And later in tablet 3:

“When Tasmisu heard Tessub’s words, he quickly arose, [took] a staff in hand, put the winds on his feet – like winged shoes, and went up on the hightowers” (48.Aii 1-2).

Kumarbi is trying to dethrone Tessub (sometimes translated as Teshub), who is currently king of the gods. Tasmisu is Tessub’s vizier (he and Tessub are both “sons,” of a sort, of Kumarbi). Actually, the Anu, Kumarbi, Tessub storyline has a lot of parallels to the Kronos, Ouranos, Zeus story… Ahem. Anyway. That would be for a different day. We’re going to set aside Kumarbi for right now and look at the vizier, Tasmisu.

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Kumarbi is on the left, Tessub on the right

Tasmisu is acting as a messenger. He grabs his staff and puts the wind on his feet, or, basically, his winged shoes. Who else has a staff and winged shoes? Specifically, in the Hellenic world? But of course! Hermes! Tasmisu also, later on in the story, leads Tessub to visit Allani, “the lady” who ruled the underworld (known as Lelwani to the Hittites, and possibly connected to the Sumerian Ereshkigal ). Hermes is also a cthonic deity who is able to go freely from the underworld and back and acts as a psychopomp, leading people safely to the underworld.

It makes me wonder if all of these stories of gods putting winged shoes on their feet and wandering around to the underworld eventually morphed into the Hellenic Hermes? There seems to be some sort of kinship there.

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Tasmisu on the left, Hermes on the right


(to see the inspiration for Teshub click HERE.) There is also more information about Hittite/Hurrian mythology. Just remember that mythology is not always kid friendly, as it were.

To read The Story of Laodike Click HERE.

The Story of Laodike (According to Some Poets)

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Ah, my silly little Greek and Roman poets. They amuse me.

Quintus of Smyrna is known for trying to bridge the gap between Homer and Virgil, but most people agree that he’s not as good and someone did say that he was the “worst  poet of antiquity” (Ernst Günther Schmidt 1999, 141). I actually really enjoy him. I mean, he is derivative of Homer, but since that was his goal I feel like that’s okay? I don’t know. I would be willing to comic it up one day.

ANYWAY. So the other day there was that comic about Hector Within the City Walls and Laodike shows up in the background and Hector goes on this rant about how he wishes Paris would be swallowed up by the earth. I don’t think it’s a coincidence that Laodike herself is later swallowed up by the very earth. I think that’s why she’s here in this scene.

Also, Acamas, her husband (according to some), was a guest-friend of Odysseus and Menelaus (again, according to some). There’s just so many connections! I think that’s one thing that’s fun about Homer, because he just references these people off-handedly, but there’s so much story there underneath.

Also, I find it so interesting that Theseus’ grandmother is chilling as Helen’s slave-woman. Why is she even there? Why is Acamas, the son of Theseus, there? Could this have any connection to the rumours that Helen of Troy was married to Theseus for some time?

ANYWAYS. Here is your random post. I am so excited I could get it done for you *waves pompoms* I hope you enjoyed it! Have a wonderful day, lovelies! *bows*


To Read Hector Says Nothing Click HERE.

Book 6, Part 3.2: Hector Says Nothing

To Start From the Beginning Click HERE.
To Read the Previous Post Click HERE.


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I know this is a lot of just Helen and Hector talking. I wish it was more fun -_- BUT IT EXISTS. Oh. My. Goodness. I almost had this all ready yesterday afternoon and then there was a problem with one of the pictures and then I fell asleep and then I had to work AND THEN IT WAS TOO LATE. *swoons*

HOWEVER. It is here for you now. The lady next to Helen is Aethra, who will show up later, hopefully, if I can get the Laodike post put together. It is hard to write comics when you are working 40+ hours a week and also trying to maintain friendships and also eating and sleeping and taking care of your introverted self. WHO KNEW.

Okay. I’m done capslocking it up. I actually did have some commentary I wanted to make.

Homer tells us that Paris built his house between Hector and Priam. I feel like this is Paris trying to show dominance over Hector. Hector is the top son, in line to take over the throne. I feel like Paris, the unaccounted for, miraculously found because saved by shepherd, upstart, wants to take over and rule Troy after Priam dies. I don’t know for sure, but I feel like maybe that is happening? Oh, Paris. He plays himself off as a silly pretty boy, but maybe there’s a devious mind at work here?

So frustrating, the way Helen is always calling herself a lady-dog and blaming herself for everything and talking down about herself. So. Frustrating. I want more from Helen and it’s just not something I’m going to get from Homer. (Which is why, I know I talk about these all the time, but really, this is why I love Helen of Sparta and By Helen’s Hand, because it gives me a Helen that does not continually call herself a lady-dog and etc.)

ANYWAY. I hope you enjoyed grumpy little Hector. Have a lovely day!


To Read The Story of Laodike (According to Some Poets) Click HERE.

Book 6, Part 3.1: Hector Within the City Walls

To Start From the Beginning Click HERE.
To Read the Previous Post Click HERE.


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Laodike doesn’t really seem to be there for any reason. She doesn’t say anything. No one talks to her. She’s just standing there looking pretty. I think there’s a reason she’s standing there, because I did background research on her, but I’m planning on doing a post about her, so you’ll have to wait for that, mwahaha…

I don’t really have much to say beyond that, except yes, I know this post is a week late. April was a bit of a mess and I have a feeling May is going to be a bit of a kerfluffle of a month. I have left the Building Supplies Store and have started a job at a library working at the circulation desk. Future retail comics may star said library, at which point I will create a fake name for it.

In the meantime, enjoy your day my lovelies! Hopefully I’ll have Part 3.2 ready by Wednesday and a Laodike post ready on Friday *fingers crossed*


To Read “Hector Says Nothing” Click HERE.

Book 6, Part 2.2: Friends or Foes

To Start From the Beginning Click HERE.
To Read the Previous Post Click HERE.


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I have so many thoughts about Diomedes. He goes on about how he’d never dare to fight an immortal, but we know that’s not true. He goes on about the sacredness of guest-friendship (also known as xenia), but is that because he’s pious or because he’s tricksy? Does he think Glaucus could actually hurt him and so finds a way around fighting him? I don’t think so, based on him trying to attack Apollo and attacking Ares. So maybe he is a pious man? I just have so many questions. I love this man.

Ahem. Anyway.

Short post today. We shall have a silly “fanfic” post on Friday and should be back on Monday with the next post, which will star our fabulous non-helmeted-but-really-should-have-one Hector.


To Read a Ridiculous Comic About Aeneas and Zombies Click HERE.
To Read “Hector Within the City Walls” Click HERE.

Book 6, Part 2.1: The Ancestry of Glaucus

To Start From the Beginning Click HERE.
To Read the Previous Post Click HERE.


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So, supposedly there’s this No Man’s Land between the armies, but I still can’t quite believe this scene and find it comical that these two guys are just Time Out having storytime as the battle rages on around them. What soldiers do that? I mean, I know why it’s happening story-wise, but looking at it purely from a non-literary point of view it’s ridiculous. I love it.

Some advice: don’t mess with Dionysos. Just don’t. There are lots of different version of what happened to Lycurgus of Thrace (not to be confused with the other non-Thracian Lycurgus), but I went with panthers killing him… although, considering how horribly my cats turn out I DO NOT KNOW WHY. Past Naomi, what were you thinking?

I was excited to see Thetis again, though.

The story of the Lady and the Failed Seduction is fairly common, and I feel like it stems from the fact that men understood that was one of the only ways women could have power over them, and it terrified them. I think it’s partly because of these stories that we still have a lot of men who are like, “Women aren’t raped, what, they’re just lying. Men are the true victims. The victims of lying horrible lady dogs.” -_- Ugh. Sorry. Is my feminism showing? How rude of me.

Ahem.

Moving on.

I highlighted the moment with the king handing over the tablet because writing was seen as this terribly dangerous magic for a long time.

I included two pissed off ladies (Glaucus’ mother and grandmother) because he doesn’t tell us their names and everything is focused on the male, on the sons, on the fathers – but dude. You cannot have babies without ladies. I wish we had more on them, but so often the women are erased or slapped on with the vague title of “Wife of…” UGH. Super not helpful for writing comics, ancient dudes. What were you thinking?

ANYWAY. Glaucus is a sassy pants and we will see him again next time. Have fun, my lovelies, and have a great day.


To Read Friends or Foes Click HERE.

Retail Life: Silo & Peasants, Vol. 1: “Let Me Spell That For You.”

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I will never understand why this lady thought I could not figure out how to spell the word “the.” How did she think I was spelling it? I mean… That’s a basic article.

Alternatively, I also had the people who would rattle of long titles in Spanish or Russian and then were annoyed when I asked how to spell it. You can just never win with these people.


To Read More Retail Comics See THIS PAGE.

Book 6, Part 1.2: The Advice of Helenus

To Start From the Beginning Click HERE.
To Read the Previous Post Click HERE.


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Helenus is not what I was imagining when I went to create his character, HOWEVER, I kind of love him? He was supposed to be much younger and cuter, but I’m okay with what happened.

Also, as a question, why does Priam have so many prophetic children? Is it because of Troy’s association with Apollo? It makes me wonder.

Also, I am realizing that not have Hector have a helmet is actually going to create some major issues with the scene with Andromache and his son Astyanax…. -_- I honestly am not sure how I’m going to finagle my way around him NOT having a helmet. But helmet’s are just so hard, guys. UGH. I guess we’ll find out.

ANYWAY. Thank you all for you patience. It’s been crazy over here in Naomi-Land. It might get better next month? Might get worse? Also I may have too many friends but I feel like I can’t really complain about that? Also I might need a time-turner?


To Read a Post About Hittite Prayers & Terror and Panic Click HERE.
To Read The Ancestry of Glaucus Click HERE.